Welding

Gas metal arc welding (GMAW), sometimes referred to by its subtypes metal inert gas (MIG) welding or metal active gas (MAG) welding, is a welding process in which an electric arc forms between a consumable wireelectrode and the workpiece metal(s), which heats the workpiece metal(s), causing them to melt and join.



Submerged arc welding (SAW) is a common arc welding process. The process requires a continuously fed consumable solid or tubular (metal cored) electrode.


Plasma arc welding is an arc welding process wherein coalescence is produced by the heat obtained from a constricted arc setup.



It is a welding technique used to join multiple pieces of metal through the use of a laser. The beam provides a concentrated heat source, allowing for narrow, deep welds and high welding rates.

Resistance spot welding (RSW) is a process in which contacting metal surface points are joined by the heat obtained from resistance to electric current. It is a subset of electric resistance welding.

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, is an arc welding process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode as inert shielding to produce the weld. The weld area and electrode is protected from oxidation or other atmospheric contamination by an inert shielding gas (argon or helium), and a filler metal is normally used.